German

Open Haus: Automatic Hotspot Logon

by VPNHaus | 07/07/2015 |Mobile, VPN

If you were a hacker targeting a network, which would be most appealing – a network contained in a residential building, an office or corporate facility, or a public place?

The information contained on the network of a residential building probably wouldn't be particularly valuable, and it would also be well-protected. You'd face even more security if trying to attack a corporate network, so that probably wouldn't be your best option either.

You'd probably target a public network – one in an airport, coffee shop or hotel – over which users dealing with sensitive information would try to connect, perhaps without having the same security protections they would have if they were in their home or office.

Public networks can be vulnerable, and they do make popular targets. Consider all the possible threats – from snooping and evil twin schemes to narrowband jamming and replay attacks – hackers can deploy against these networks.

It's also important to consider that there are now many more public hotspots than there were even a few years ago – global Wi-Fi hotspots are expected to triple from 1.3 million in 2011 to 5.8 million this year.

For business users in particular, hotspot connections are ideal for when they're at day-long events (when using mobile data on their phone or tablet would quickly drain their battery) or when they travel abroad (to avoid costly roaming fees).

For these users, and for anyone else who relies on hotspots for secure remote access, NCP engineering has integrated Automatic Hotspot Logon into its NCP Secure Client.

How It Works

A safeguard protecting the end device against attack is not often provided by the Wi-Fi operator, so users have to take care of their own security measures, specifically when it comes to safeguarding confidentiality and the device connected via the hotspot.

The actual security risk comes from the fact that the user must logon to the hotspot via a browser, outside of the protected area of a VPN. This means that during logon, the end device is not protected. Normally, this type of action does not comply with corporate policy, which usually forbids direct surfing on the Internet and only allows certain protocols. For this reason, a firewall solution on the end device that offers comprehensive protection has to secure the critical phase of logon at the hotspot.

For network administrators, the selling point of NCP’s Automatic Hotspot Logon is that it takes the user, and the chance of their fallibility, out of the equation.

NCP’s Automatic Hotspot Logon includes integration with the NCP Personal Firewall, which offers protection of end devices. Without this feature, the remote VPN client could be vulnerable to attack at any point in the Wi-Fi or hotspot connection process.

This is a popular feature among NCP users and administrators alike, and trade show attendees told us they were impressed by it when they saw it in action. Stay tuned later this summer, when NCP will update its hotspot logon feature to optimize functionality and simplicity for all users.

Open Haus is a monthly series that explores the key features of NCP’s Remote Access VPN.

Read More:<br>

Remote Access VPNs For Dummies

 

Remote Access VPN For Dummies</em>, we cover:

- The full VPN landscape, including hybrid IPsec/SSL VPN solutions
- The evolution of remote access VPN
- How to provide users with secure remote access
- How to simplify remote access VPN and reduce costs

Download Now

Remote Access VPN For Dummies</em>, we cover:

- The full VPN landscape, including hybrid IPsec/SSL VPN solutions
- The evolution of remote access VPN
- How to provide users with secure remote access
- How to simplify remote access VPN and reduce costs

Download Now

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