A Look at BYOD in 2016

Happy 2016! It’s a new year, and a time for fresh resolutions to improve your life over the next 12 months, whether that involves running a marathon, getting a new job or taking that trip abroad you’ve been putting off. But for businesses, those New Year’s resolutions should be expressly focused on stronger security. With data breaches, email hacks and password thefts becoming more and more commonplace – and each cyberattack casting wider nets of victims – this is one resolution that can’t be allowed to fall through. This is especially true for organizations adopting BYOD and mobile-friendly policies. Just as developers have taken a “mobile first” approach to creating new apps – designing and optimizing apps from the ground up for mobile viewing and touchscreen interfaces – companies have begun taking the same approach to how their employees operate, whether it’s by allowing them to use their own personal devices in the workplace or utilizing either personal or company-owned devices while working remotely. As CIO.com points out, it’s important that this strategy pays special attention to security. Integrating more wireless and mobile devices into your company may make employees’ lives easier and more convenient, but it can open up serious potential security vulnerabilities if the proper precautions aren’t in place. A secure remote access VPN paired with cybersecurity policies like multi-factor authentication can help defend mobile communications – and protect the personal and corporate data that those communications send back and forth – from external threats. A New Year’s Resolution for Stronger Mobile Security As BNDA notes in its top 10 IT predictions for 2016, more than half...

Open Haus: Seamless Roaming [VIDEO]

Imagine this: You’re sitting on the train, trying to get your work done, when your Wi-Fi connection – not always the most reliable on trains – drops out. Maybe you manage to re-connect in a few minutes. Maybe you switch to your data plan to get back online. Or, maybe when the train gets close enough to a station, you can switch to their hotspot, and save some data in the process. Over the course of that trip, you had to cycle through different networks to maintain an internet connection, constantly losing any sessions you had running and forcing any apps you were using to restart. Not only that, but when end users have to switch that often between connections, it can make re-connecting to a VPN slow or frustrating, and they may opt to forgo the VPN altogether if those issues persist. It’s an understandable concern of inconvenience – after all, frequent network disruptions can make working remotely virtually impossible. But indulging in that concern can also dredge up even more problematic security issues. Users shouldn’t have to choose between network convenience and VPN security.   How It Works With NCP engineering’s Secure Enterprise Solution they don’t have to. The on-the-go demands of today’s mobile workers, who need reliable internet connections wherever they may be and also require the secure remote access provided by a VPN, make seamless roaming a prerequisite for how to stay both online and secure nowadays – and it’s a prerequisite built into NCP’s VPN solutions. While users may shift from one connection or IP address to the next, depending on where they are...

Endpoint Security: The Cornerstone of the Cybersecurity Puzzle

Some enterprises occasionally fail to realize that many of the differing cybersecurity services available today aren’t optional add-ons but necessary, oftentimes critical, pieces of a complete security strategy. There are a suite of unique security protocols and services that all work together to protect a network and safeguard valuable business data from intrusion. Cybersecurity is a holistic process that requires multiple moving parts working in tandem; failure to do so could leave networks with painful vulnerabilities, not to mention wasted resources. Endpoint security is one such critical piece of the cybersecurity puzzle. While it’s difficult to rank security systems in order of importance, it’s hard to imagine any of the other measures used to secure a network being functional without this one in place. It works like this: Endpoint security is installed on a client/server and may be managed by a central server, or gateway, that runs a security program to verify a network device. VPN and anti-virus software installed on an approved system requires the user to comply with policies before accessing the network. Without the permissions, a user can’t get into the shared network. Without this safeguard in place at the outset of network access, it’s hard to imagine many of the other potential security systems being fully capable of doing their job. Endpoint security is a proactive prevention method, while almost all other security systems are reactive, after-the fact measures. Incident response, for instance, functions as damage control. If endpoint security isn’t in place, the likelihood of a data breach happening is higher all around. An incident response strategy can’t predict a security failure ahead of...

‘Tis the Season: Why Cyberattackers Set their Sights on the Holidays

The holiday shopping season is back again and now in full gear. With Black Friday and Cyber Monday kicking off the annual frenzy, shoppers are already rummaging through department stores or scouring online marketplaces like Amazon to find that perfect gift – and ideally, at the perfect price too. The ecommerce side of the season is expected to be especially successful this year, with online sales predicted to jump 14 percent over the last holiday season, accounting for over $70 billion and approximately 9 percent of all U.S. retail sales. It’s great news for shoppers, great news for businesses and, unfortunately, great news for hackers too. The busy season makes December a more opportune time for cyberattackers to strike than the rest of the year. Remember Target’s data breach? Over 70 million customer records were compromised, including 30 to 40 million credit and debit cards, all at the peak of the 2013 holiday shopping season – ensuring there were plenty of potential victims and transactions for hackers to leech off of. Much like tax season, the holiday shopping season involves so much exchanging of personal and financial information while buying products and attempting to land deals that this time of year becomes a gold mine for cyberattackers. But it’s not just the shopping side of things that makes people vulnerable to cyberattacks; it’s all the vacation time too. Because as much as the holidays should mean taking some time off from work, not all of us can disconnect from it completely – especially with the option to view work emails on our phone, anywhere and at any time. But...

Cybersecurity Isn’t Generational: Why Millennials May Not Be the Tech Hope of the Future

Of all the assumptions made and beliefs held about millennials, one of the most common is that they’re uniquely tech-savvy. After all, this is the first generation to grow up being exposed first to the advent of computers and the Internet, and now to smartphones, tablets and always-on connectivity. So it’s no surprise that governments have been banking on these digital natives, who practically eat, sleep and breathe technology, to become their cybersecurity saviors. Who better than the first 24/7 tech generation to demonstrate a keen understanding of the current threat landscape and the technical skills necessary to implement the best defense-in-depth measures to counter those threats? Unfortunately, that may be little more than a pipedream, if a new survey is any indication. That report, “Securing our Future: Closing the Cybersecurity Talent Gap,” released by the National Cyber Security Alliance and Raytheon, identified a significant cybersecurity awareness gap among millennials worldwide – specifically, respondents between the ages of 18 and 26, hailing from countries like the U.S., U.K., Germany, France and Japan. Despite the presumption that millennials would be naturally more predisposed to grasping and deploying best practices for cybersecurity, as well as pursuing cyber careers to do so, many of them sound alarmingly out of touch. Here are just a few of that survey’s findings: Close to 80 percent had neither spoken with a cybersecurity professional before or weren’t sure if they had done so 69 percent felt that their high school computer classes hadn’t prepared them for a cyber career 67 percent said they hadn’t heard about any cyberattacks in the news over the past year Two-thirds...