Seamless Roaming or Always On: The Remote Access VPN Feature Digital Nomads May Be Missing

In remote working environments, the Digital Nomad isn’t tied to a desk or cubicle, but he has close relationships with his coworkers. The Digital Nomad works exclusively from mobile devices that connect wirelessly to the Internet, and she’s still able to finish all her tasks on time. For now, these workers are generally the exception to the rule, but that may not be the case for much longer. One-third of business leaders anticipate that by 2020, more than half of their full-time workforce will be working remotely. It’s not difficult to see why remote work is so popular. Today, Digital Nomads can be more nomadic than ever, setting up new mobile “offices” wherever there’s a network connection. They don’t even need a hard surface to put their device on or an outlet to plug into. But, what they do need for security purposes is a remote access VPN to enable a secure connection back to the corporate network. VPNs are reliable, but the problem is, network interruptions have long seemed inevitable. They get in the way and disrupt the user’s computing session. That’s when a VPN feature known as seamless roaming or always on comes into play, allowing a user to move between different networks without losing the connection. The Value of Seamless Roaming Whether you’re a finance executive fighting dead zones as you work on your laptop from a train, or a sales professional working from an airport across a spotty Wi-Fi connection, each time there’s a network disruption, the user has to manually restart the VPN connection to continue working. This is why seamless roaming is no...

NCP engineering Earns ‘Champion’ Rating in techconsult Report

This year, cyberattacks are expected to rain down at a rate of more than 117,000 per day, adding up to more than 42.8 million total incidents. As these attacks are launched and subsequently investigated, the root cause of many of them will turn out to be the result of employee action – basic human error – such as accidentally violating a remote access policy. With these figures in mind, the new report “Security Solution Vendors 2015,” conducted by German analyst firm techconsult, analyzes the entire network, data, storage and endpoint security landscape, while identifying top providers and solutions that are on the front lines protecting businesses from these 42.8 million attacks. The report bodes well for NCP engineering and our remote access VPN solutions. Techconsult found that NCP “dominates” the network security space, while highlighting how NCP’s Secure Enterprise Solution “win…clearly against the competition” from other VPN solution providers. This assessment is reflected by NCP’s presence in the “Champion” quadrant, comprising all security solution vendors, based on evaluations from the market and users, as well as experts. NCP also earns a “Champion” rating when only network security vendors – those with VPN, external firewalls and Unified Threat Management (UTM) solutions – are assessed. NCP is the top solution provider in this quadrant, and we stand out for our 100 percent user satisfaction rating. In the Virtual Private Network quadrant, NCP again earns top marks and a “Champion” rating, with the report noting, “NCP has been able to set itself above the rest with the experts’ evaluations based on its excellent solution assessment as well as its company-specific framework conditions.”...

Open Haus: Automatic Hotspot Logon

If you were a hacker targeting a network, which would be most appealing – a network contained in a residential building, an office or corporate facility, or a public place? The information contained on the network of a residential building probably wouldn’t be particularly valuable, and it would also be well-protected. You’d face even more security if trying to attack a corporate network, so that probably wouldn’t be your best option either. You’d probably target a public network – one in an airport, coffee shop or hotel – over which users dealing with sensitive information would try to connect, perhaps without having the same security protections they would have if they were in their home or office. Public networks can be vulnerable, and they do make popular targets. Consider all the possible threats – from snooping and evil twin schemes to narrowband jamming and replay attacks – hackers can deploy against these networks. It’s also important to consider that there are now many more public hotspots than there were even a few years ago – global Wi-Fi hotspots are expected to triple from 1.3 million in 2011 to 5.8 million this year. For business users in particular, hotspot connections are ideal for when they’re at day-long events (when using mobile data on their phone or tablet would quickly drain their battery) or when they travel abroad (to avoid costly roaming fees). For these users, and for anyone else who relies on hotspots for secure remote access, NCP engineering has integrated Automatic Hotspot Logon into its NCP Secure Client. How It Works A safeguard protecting the end device against attack...

Battlefield Mobile: Threats Targeting In-Motion Endpoints Climbed in 2014

By now, cybersecurity veterans are well-versed in the most common attack vectors exploited by hackers to breach their corporate networks. Brute force attacks, phishing schemes, SQL injections – they’re all proven attack methods that network administrators prepare for and defend against. But what about the next frontier? What attack vectors and endpoints do hackers now think are most vulnerable? It starts with mobile devices. They look like the perfect target to many attackers, who think that they can exploit the fact that so many connections over these endpoints go unsecured and that these devices are so popular with employees – 74 percent of organizations use or plan to use BYOD. In addition to mobile, another frontier could be devices that rely on machine-to-machine (M2M) communications, which create a scenario where human beings are entirely removed from the equation. As this small, isolated group of attack targets grows, network administrators need to be ready to fight back wherever hackers go, whether that’s on the mobile, M2M or some other battlefield. The Next Trends in Cybercrime The landscape of cyberthreats network administrators must be aware of is ever-evolving with the advent of new technologies and new criminal strategies. While there’s consensus in the security industry that mobile attacks will only increase in the coming years, the current prevalence of these incidents is really in the eye of the beholder. Only about 15 million mobile devices were infected by malware midway through 2014 – an infection rate of less than 1 percent. On the other hand, in the last year, mobile malware attacks did increase by 75 percent, off the back of...

Long Live Windows XP…. And Mobile Security

At one point or another, we’ve all been blindsided by news that has literally changed our lives. Though we’re often left momentarily stunned, it’s imperative to figure out how to adjust and carry on. It’s not always easy, but you know the expression – where there’s a will, there’s a way. However, the discontinuation of support for Windows XP is not news that should take anyone by surprise, as its April 8, 2014 retirement date was officially announced almost a full year ago. Cyber criminals surely have the date circled on their calendars, as the security risks posed to the numerous users and enterprises still using Windows XP beyond that date have been well documented. Recently, these risks have become both more prominent and dangerous. ZDNet reports that, using a form of malware called Backdoor.Ploutus, hackers are starting to remotely access a portion of the 95 percent of ATMs in the United States still using the soon-to-be deceased operating system (OS). “By simply sending a text message to the compromised system, hackers can control the ATM, walk up to it, and collect dispensed cash.” Clearly, this is a major cause for concern. And it’s not exactly as if Microsoft has been trying to sweep the retirement of XP under the rug, either. In addition tosending pop-up dialog boxes encouraging users of the 488 million systems still using XP to upgrade to another Microsoft OS, the corporation even went so far as to recruit tech-savvy friends and family to help “old holdouts” make the transition. Unfortunately, the results have been lackluster. HelpNetSecurity reports that many users call these efforts a...