Mobile payments and security — money walks, money talks

Once upon a time a mobile phone was something we used for talking. Today making a call ranks sixth on the list of most common uses for a mobile phone. Now there’s a new kid on the block that, in time, will push making a call even lower down the list. Mobile payment, or m-payment, is taking off. Early adopters like Starbucks already attribute significant revenue gains to their investment in mobile. Although overall mobile payments adoption and usage rates are still a fraction of standard credit/debit card transactions industry watchers expect this to change very quickly.

Internet of Things raises fresh security challenges for industry

For many years industries like oil and gas, electricity, agriculture and utilities have relied on operational communications infrastructure outside the main corporate network to collect data and provide supervisory control. Known as Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems the data they collect leads to efficient allocation of resources, monitors safety conditions and improves operational decision-making. But now, with the emergence of Internet of Things (IoT) technology, industrial organizations are eager to deploy new wireless machine-to-machine (M2M) devices to collect even more data from field assets in remote, geographically dispersed locations. The number of sensors and data points in industrial networks looks set to multiply exponentially overnight. As a consequence, there will be more access points than ever before. Security, therefore, will be an important factor in determining the overall success of IoT deployment.

Threat Intelligence-as-a-Service brings SIEM Within Reach of SMEs

Organizations are being targeted by cybercriminals more than ever. According to the latest statistics from Symantec, 52.4% of phishing attacks in December 2015 were against small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). The month prior demonstrated an even bigger spike. The situation is forcing businesses of all sizes to augment their network and mobile security. Topping the list of improvements include the need for better threat intelligence and endpoint security.

Security information and event management (SIEM) systems provide a valuable tool to gather threat intelligence through activities logged from various applications and devices. The logs are then combined to create threat intelligence reports that can identify signs of unauthorized behavior. Because of their complexity, until recently SIEM systems were considered exclusive to those large enterprises with access to the sizeable budgets and resources required to maintain them.

Big Data and IT Security – SIEM as an Analysis Tool

Over the last few years, gleaning useful information from massive amounts of data has also become more difficult for IT security and approaches to Big Data and information analysis are a critical topic in this sector. The number of users, end devices, applications and log files are constantly on the rise. At the same time, attackers are becoming more sophisticated and professional while constantly adapting their strategies. Companies are now facing a completely new level of risks and challenges to their IT security operations.

Frequently companies have more than enough data on security events, including successful penetrations and potential vulnerabilities. Enormous volumes of data are generated by network components, storage systems or applications. Security threats buried among this data must be taken seriously, however attacks often remain unnoticed or they are not discovered in time due to a lack of structured data. Analyzing and interpreting this data and deploying a rapid response is almost impossible without specialist software.

Missing the Forest for the Trees: How Cyberattacks in the News Can Mask the Threat to SMBs [VIDEO]

Cyberattacks and data breaches have been making headlines more and more these last few years. Whether it was the 40 million customer credit and debit cards stolen from Target in 2013, the major email leak at Sony Pictures Entertainment in 2014 or the 22 million personnel records compromised in the federal Office of Personnel Management this year, it’s hard to deny we’re seeing an already troubling trend grow even bigger. But perhaps there’s an even more worrisome trend at play that is not only suffering a lack of media exposure, but is actually being exacerbated by that lack of coverage. Because while all of the above victims and plenty more – including Home Depot, Anthem, P.F. Chang’s and JPMorgan Chase – represented serious and major breaches of consumer or corporate information, they’re also all major enterprises. And you would be remiss to believe that only the biggest companies get taken down by cyberattackers, when, in fact, it’s the smaller businesses that often prove the most frequent and fruitful targets for hackers. A survey released by Nationwide Insurance revealed that approximately 80 percent of all small- to mid-sized businesses in the U.S. don’t have a cyberattack response plan in place. Additionally, 60 percent of all cyberattacks are targeted at these same SMBs. If this seems grossly disproportionate with the amount of news coverage given to hacked enterprises over SMBs, that’s because it is – and that’s exactly what cyberthieves are banking on. Because SMBs have fewer resources to work with, and are less likely to learn about cyberthreats to their business from the news, they end up lacking the tools...