IIoT, Mobile and Cloud Security Take Center Stage at RSAC 2017

The RSA Conference (RSAC) is always a major highlight in the IT security professional calendar and this year’s show was no exception. In this blog, NCP engineering reviews some of the standout enterprise machine-to-machine (M2M), mobile client and cloud security trends to emerge from RSAC 2017. The show is also a win-win for NCP. Our strong track record with US technology partners means that NCP is well-known to US-base customers and prospects. At the same time, our experience in fulfilling Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) or Industry 4.0 projects in Germany means we had a great deal of knowledge and insight to share with prospects in this security segment, one that is in its early stages in the United States.

Web of Spies

Ever since Edward Snowden revealed the extent of state-sponsored espionage over the Internet in 2013 businesses have been acutely aware of just how vulnerable data communications are to being intercepted. It is no coincidence that in the same period cybercriminals have also stepped up their attempts to spy on organisations. For example, the use of Advanced Persistent Threat (APT) malware and ransomware to try to capture valuable financial or customer data for financial gain has risen dramatically. While no defense method is ever 100% impregnable the risk of snooping and theft of sensitive data can be significantly reduced by encrypting it using VPNs.

As the Dust Settles: The Value of Secure Remote Access in the Hours After a Cyberattack

The first 24 hours after a cyberattack are chaotic. The investigations and conclusions will come far down the road, but in the immediate aftermath of an attack, the entire organization is in reaction mode. The public relations team will update media members hungry for additional details. If an attack affects an organization’s own employees, the human resources department will issue alerts internally. The legal team will remain on standby to ensure regulatory requirements are met, offer counsel and guide the organization through the first few days of what is likely to be a process lasting many years. For the IT department, meanwhile, those first few hours are all about containment – discovering the origin of an attack, isolating or stopping its harmful effects, and securing IT systems to assure continuity. Yet, in many cases, victims of cyberattacks aren’t taking these critical first steps. According to a new survey by the SANS Institute, only 59 percent of organizations are able to contain attacks within 24 hours and more than half claim to be dissatisfied with the length of time it takes for them to contain and recover from an attack. Even the federal government doesn’t really have a perfectly coordinated strategy for responding to these events. As last summer’s hack of the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) showed, the government isn’t well equipped to react quickly to emerging threats and successful attacks, and individual agencies don’t always take ownership of a coordinated response. Fortunately, most businesses don’t have such a burden. Most are more agile than the government, and therefore better positioned to respond quickly, even if the findings of...

Seamless Roaming or Always On: The Remote Access VPN Feature Digital Nomads May Be Missing

In remote working environments, the Digital Nomad isn’t tied to a desk or cubicle, but he has close relationships with his coworkers. The Digital Nomad works exclusively from mobile devices that connect wirelessly to the Internet, and she’s still able to finish all her tasks on time. For now, these workers are generally the exception to the rule, but that may not be the case for much longer. One-third of business leaders anticipate that by 2020, more than half of their full-time workforce will be working remotely. It’s not difficult to see why remote work is so popular. Today, Digital Nomads can be more nomadic than ever, setting up new mobile “offices” wherever there’s a network connection. They don’t even need a hard surface to put their device on or an outlet to plug into. But, what they do need for security purposes is a remote access VPN to enable a secure connection back to the corporate network. VPNs are reliable, but the problem is, network interruptions have long seemed inevitable. They get in the way and disrupt the user’s computing session. That’s when a VPN feature known as seamless roaming or always on comes into play, allowing a user to move between different networks without losing the connection. The Value of Seamless Roaming Whether you’re a finance executive fighting dead zones as you work on your laptop from a train, or a sales professional working from an airport across a spotty Wi-Fi connection, each time there’s a network disruption, the user has to manually restart the VPN connection to continue working. This is why seamless roaming is no...