Simple steps to a secure public hotspot connection

In recent years, the way we work has transformed. The rise of ever more powerful mobile devices has freed us from our desks. Our Internet-enabled smartphones and tablets allow us to remain constantly connected even while we are on the move. Sensing a business opportunity, carriers have responded by providing Wi-Fi hotspots for our convenience in public spaces everywhere – from coffee shops, restaurants, shopping malls, hotels and exhibition halls to trains, airports and even airplanes. Tempting as it may be to use them to reduce any idle time, public Wi-Fi hot spots are not without risks. There are over 100,000 unsecured public Wi-Fi hotspots around the world. Furthermore, employees often fail to follow best practices. It only takes one mistake for sensitive company data to be jeopardized. However, by deploying VPNs and following some simple guidelines it is possible for organizations to overcome these risks and ensure all employees are equipped to secure their mobile client connections.

Mobile Banking Apps: How Safe are They?

Mobile banking apps are set to revolutionize how we bank. According to KPMG, the number of mobile banking users globally is forecast to double to 1.8 billion over the next four years. In the UK regulators have announced new rules to let customers access details of their entire finances through a single mobile phone app by 2018. In the US mobile banking industry, technology has yet to overcome fundamental trust issues but the idea is starting to take off among financial services consumers. The banks and financial institutions are working hard to make their mobile apps as secure as possible. User behavior meanwhile has some catching up to do. For example, connections to free and unsecured Wi-Fi are open and vulnerable to fraud. To reduce security risks, it’s a good idea to use a virtual private network (VPN). This is a tried and tested way to secure the connection and encrypt all data transferred between the mobile device and the bank.

Staying Safe at Wi-Fi Hotspots

Wi-Fi hotspots in coffee shops, hotels, railway stations and airports have become a welcome resource for any business traveler, providing them with a convenient means to carry on working while on the move. Employers, in turn, are increasingly happy to embrace the accompanying productivity benefits. Over 80% of enterprises now allow employees to use personal devices to connect to corporate networks.

Yet public Wi-Fi has a dubious security reputation. Even with password protection, public hotspots are an open invitation for anyone with illicit intentions to snoop and intercept data communications to their heart’s content.

Open Haus: Friendly Net Detection

The prevalence of remote work has climbed steadily over the last decade thanks to advances in technology and attitudes towards the practice. According to Global Workplace Analytics, teleworking has increased about 80 percent between 2005 and 2012. Still, only a few million Americans consider their home, or somewhere other than an office, to be their primary place of work. What’s holding remote work back? A lot of it is cultural, as well as logistical, but there are also lingering security concerns. Despite the convenience of the practice, accessing the corporate network remotely doesn’t carry with it quite the same guarantee that a user’s end-to-end connection to the network is entirely secure. That’s why NCP engineering’s Remote Access VPN solution is equipped with Friendly Net Detection (FND), a technology that automatically recognizes safe, friendly networks or unsafe, unfriendly networks, no matter where the user may be, thereby protecting end devices against Internet attacks via 3G/4G, Wi-Fi and LAN. How it Works FND is a component of all NCP Secure VPN Clients, and since the FND server is installed independent of the VPN gateway, it’s therefore agnostic to any particular operating system or third-party vendor gateway. Once installed, the FND client is configured within the VPN client’s firewall settings. The feature works by forcing the network to identify itself to the end user’s device, and then dynamically activating or deactivating the appropriate firewall rules and security mechanisms, depending on whether it’s a known/secure/friendly network or an unknown/insecure/unfriendly network. If the FND client is successful in its attempt to contact and authenticate the FND server, then it can confirm that the device...

Open Haus: Wi-Fi and Seamless Roaming for Mobile Workers

When you hear the term “mobile worker,” what image comes to mind? Is it the employee who is constantly taking his laptop into different corners of the office, working from their desk, conference rooms and couches? Or is it the “road warrior” executive who works from airports, trains, cafés, hotels and anywhere else she can find a Wi-Fi or 3G/4G connection? Whatever you picture, the fact is that mobility is now a key expectation of many employees. Those who work from laptops, tablets and other mobile devices need to be certain that the technology they depend on is able to follow them from place to place, without any service interruption. As an example, remote workers often use a VPN to securely connect to their corporate network, no matter their location. But what happens if their network connection changes? Imagine an employee who works on her laptop while commuting by train, but constantly loses her Wi-Fi connection as she travels. You’d think that every time the network connection switches between Wi-Fi and 4G, she would need to log into her VPN. The employee would get frustrated and not be nearly as productive. To avoid this scenario and others that impede mobile working, NCP engineering developed two key additions to its Remote Access VPN solution – Wi-Fi roaming and seamless roaming. With these features, the VPN tunnel connection is constantly maintained without disrupting the user’s computing session, even if their network connection changes. Here’s how these two features enhance NCP engineering’s Remote Access VPN solution: Wi-Fi Roaming Say a remote worker moves within the range of several wireless access points using...

Vehicle VPNs, Part Two: Business World Implications

In recent years, remote access security has become a major focus of IT departments in businesses small and large. The rapid growth in the use of smartphones and tablet computers, the bring-your-own-device (BYOD) trend and an increasing number of companies allowing employees to work from home have all but assured this. VPNs, as such, have become widely popular as a means of securing those data tunnels between end devices and internal corporate networks. But now, there’s another endpoint that requires the attention of IT managers: cars. Actually, to be more specific, “connected cars.” In a previous blog post, we discussed the continuing evolution of connected cars and how vehicle VPNs can help prevent critical security breaches. The vulnerabilities we covered focused on travel safety and machine-to-machine (M2M) concerns in people’s homes. Today, we’ll take a look at the more business-oriented issues at play and their implications on the corporate world. The Basics of Remote Access Let’s start with the same basic principle that applies to remote access everywhere: a corporate network is only as secure as the device and communications channel used to access it. VPNs have long been used to secure communications between laptops and private company networks across many industries. In most cases, employees were using company-issued laptops. In the last five years, however, we’ve seen a paradigm shift where more and more people are using personal laptops as well as smartphones and tablet computers to work from outside the office. BYOD certainly created a few headaches for IT departments when it came to security, but the benefits were too substantial to ignore — flexibility, improved access...