Going on Holiday? Don’t Forget to Pack Your VPN

People have become accustomed to using their mobile devices for the dual purposes of business and leisure. Yet, research shows when they travel they don’t really give the data on their devices a second thought. Instead they are much more likely to care about whether the hotel or apartment they are staying at has good Wi-Fi access. This reliance on public Wi-Fi on holiday risks exposing any sensitive business information on personal devices to hackers and snoopers. For this reason, it is best to always take your VPN technology with you on holiday to encrypt all Internet communications while away.

How to Enable a Secure Cloud VPN

Cloud computing has been around now for about a decade. It offers companies the chance to lease computing resources and services on-demand over the Internet from cloud services providers. In this way, companies gain the freedom to quickly scale IT systems up and down in line with changing business circumstances as well as keep up with the latest technology advances. The cloud services model is also a lot more cost effective than equivalent in-house deployments. Yet, despite all of this, many organizations still hesitate to embrace cloud services citing remote access security concerns, especially when employees are connecting to cloud applications when on the road. To address such concerns, providers can offer their customers remote access out of the cloud or VPN as a service.

Simple steps to a secure public hotspot connection

In recent years, the way we work has transformed. The rise of ever more powerful mobile devices has freed us from our desks. Our Internet-enabled smartphones and tablets allow us to remain constantly connected even while we are on the move. Sensing a business opportunity, carriers have responded by providing Wi-Fi hotspots for our convenience in public spaces everywhere – from coffee shops, restaurants, shopping malls, hotels and exhibition halls to trains, airports and even airplanes. Tempting as it may be to use them to reduce any idle time, public Wi-Fi hot spots are not without risks. There are over 100,000 unsecured public Wi-Fi hotspots around the world. Furthermore, employees often fail to follow best practices. It only takes one mistake for sensitive company data to be jeopardized. However, by deploying VPNs and following some simple guidelines it is possible for organizations to overcome these risks and ensure all employees are equipped to secure their mobile client connections.

Mobile Banking Apps: How Safe are They?

Mobile banking apps are set to revolutionize how we bank. According to KPMG, the number of mobile banking users globally is forecast to double to 1.8 billion over the next four years. In the UK regulators have announced new rules to let customers access details of their entire finances through a single mobile phone app by 2018. In the US mobile banking industry, technology has yet to overcome fundamental trust issues but the idea is starting to take off among financial services consumers. The banks and financial institutions are working hard to make their mobile apps as secure as possible. User behavior meanwhile has some catching up to do. For example, connections to free and unsecured Wi-Fi are open and vulnerable to fraud. To reduce security risks, it’s a good idea to use a virtual private network (VPN). This is a tried and tested way to secure the connection and encrypt all data transferred between the mobile device and the bank.

Staying Safe at Wi-Fi Hotspots

Wi-Fi hotspots in coffee shops, hotels, railway stations and airports have become a welcome resource for any business traveler, providing them with a convenient means to carry on working while on the move. Employers, in turn, are increasingly happy to embrace the accompanying productivity benefits. Over 80% of enterprises now allow employees to use personal devices to connect to corporate networks.

Yet public Wi-Fi has a dubious security reputation. Even with password protection, public hotspots are an open invitation for anyone with illicit intentions to snoop and intercept data communications to their heart’s content.

Open Haus: Friendly Net Detection

The prevalence of remote work has climbed steadily over the last decade thanks to advances in technology and attitudes towards the practice. According to Global Workplace Analytics, teleworking has increased about 80 percent between 2005 and 2012. Still, only a few million Americans consider their home, or somewhere other than an office, to be their primary place of work. What’s holding remote work back? A lot of it is cultural, as well as logistical, but there are also lingering security concerns. Despite the convenience of the practice, accessing the corporate network remotely doesn’t carry with it quite the same guarantee that a user’s end-to-end connection to the network is entirely secure. That’s why NCP engineering’s Remote Access VPN solution is equipped with Friendly Net Detection (FND), a technology that automatically recognizes safe, friendly networks or unsafe, unfriendly networks, no matter where the user may be, thereby protecting end devices against Internet attacks via 3G/4G, Wi-Fi and LAN. How it Works FND is a component of all NCP Secure VPN Clients, and since the FND server is installed independent of the VPN gateway, it’s therefore agnostic to any particular operating system or third-party vendor gateway. Once installed, the FND client is configured within the VPN client’s firewall settings. The feature works by forcing the network to identify itself to the end user’s device, and then dynamically activating or deactivating the appropriate firewall rules and security mechanisms, depending on whether it’s a known/secure/friendly network or an unknown/insecure/unfriendly network. If the FND client is successful in its attempt to contact and authenticate the FND server, then it can confirm that the device...