Mobile payments and security — money walks, money talks

Once upon a time a mobile phone was something we used for talking. Today making a call ranks sixth on the list of most common uses for a mobile phone. Now there’s a new kid on the block that, in time, will push making a call even lower down the list. Mobile payment, or m-payment, is taking off. Early adopters like Starbucks already attribute significant revenue gains to their investment in mobile. Although overall mobile payments adoption and usage rates are still a fraction of standard credit/debit card transactions industry watchers expect this to change very quickly.

Web of Spies

Ever since Edward Snowden revealed the extent of state-sponsored espionage over the Internet in 2013 businesses have been acutely aware of just how vulnerable data communications are to being intercepted. It is no coincidence that in the same period cybercriminals have also stepped up their attempts to spy on organisations. For example, the use of Advanced Persistent Threat (APT) malware and ransomware to try to capture valuable financial or customer data for financial gain has risen dramatically. While no defense method is ever 100% impregnable the risk of snooping and theft of sensitive data can be significantly reduced by encrypting it using VPNs.

Cloud Security Pitfalls to Avoid

Cloud computing technology is fast becoming an attractive alternative to maintaining IT systems and applications on premise. In-house management and maintenance of IT is costly and resource-hungry. Small and medium-sized businesses in particular benefit from the way cloud services give them access to greater processing power and IT expertise than they could ever aspire to with the modest budgets and resources of their own. Cloud computing also provides an opportunity for large organizations to enjoy economies of scale for the high data volumes produced by the many and various devices, operating systems and applications they use.

Flaws in Industrial IoT Underline Importance of Secure Connectivity

According to the leading analyst firm Gartner Group over 50% of major new business processes and systems will incorporate some element of the Internet of Things (IoT) by the year 2020. The potential for IoT to revolutionize existing business models is very exciting. Industrial manufacturers are clearly in a hurry to capitalize on this virtual world of opportunities where new revenue streams flow from managing and servicing customers’ equipment remotely.

But before everyone gets carried away it is important to pause for a moment to consider how with the rush towards digitalization there is also a risk that IoT growth will outstrip cybersecurity considerations.

Threat Intelligence-as-a-Service brings SIEM Within Reach of SMEs

Organizations are being targeted by cybercriminals more than ever. According to the latest statistics from Symantec, 52.4% of phishing attacks in December 2015 were against small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). The month prior demonstrated an even bigger spike. The situation is forcing businesses of all sizes to augment their network and mobile security. Topping the list of improvements include the need for better threat intelligence and endpoint security.

Security information and event management (SIEM) systems provide a valuable tool to gather threat intelligence through activities logged from various applications and devices. The logs are then combined to create threat intelligence reports that can identify signs of unauthorized behavior. Because of their complexity, until recently SIEM systems were considered exclusive to those large enterprises with access to the sizeable budgets and resources required to maintain them.