A priority on today’s to do list: Please secure remote access once and for all!

Most IT devices have some form of remote access, whether via web browser or app. As long as devices are accessed by an authorized user from within an internal network, this isn’t a problem. Unfortunately, many devices, especially routers and smart home gateways are also accessible from the internet. And that’s where the problems begin. In fact, they have never stopped. Open remote access is among the greatest yet unfortunately inevitable threats of IT devices. Anybody who can access the management interface can control the device and usually the owner will not notice. Devices that are connected to the internet are constantly scanned and scrutinized for vulnerabilities. Open remote management interfaces should be treated as the digital equivalent of a loaded gun. It can be used but you need to know exactly what you are doing and take every possible precaution.

Careful Connections are Key to Mitigating Cyber-Attacks on IIoT Systems

Energy plants and factories have always been prime targets for delivering a devastating setback and psychological blow against an enemy. Today, successful attacks against critical infrastructure can be launched in cyberspace. In 2015, a cyber-attack on a Ukrainian power station caused a loss of power affecting 225,000 customers and the world took note. In the U.S., the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has raised concerns over the growing number of cyber attacks on industrial control networks. In response, they recently published guidelines to “provide a strategic focus on security and enhance the trust framework that underpins the IoT ecosystem.” The document calls for a combined approach. Among the measures discussed are considered connectivity and defense in depth. Managed Virtual Private Network (VPN) connections and two-factor authentication can help secure critical connections to give IIoT data traffic the in-depth protection it needs.

Mitigating Retail Vulnerabilities

The threat of cybercrime against retailers is ever present. According to the 2016 Global Threat Intelligence Report, retailers are the top targets and receive up to three times the number of attacks as second placed financial institutions. Around 70% of retailers in Europe admit to being targeted while 45% of the attacks are known to have been successful. In the past 12 months, the US retail sector has also seen repeated attacks on electronic point-of-sale (POS) systems as well as consistently high volumes of phishing emails aimed at tricking insiders into giving access to corporate networks. With online takings expected to account for 21% of overall sales in 2017, cybercriminals will continue to try and profit from any vulnerabilities they can find in retail systems. To counter this, retailers have a variety of mitigation techniques available to them including VPNs. The best security remains multi-layered since no single technology can nullify all threats at all times.

The IoT gateway next door

Internet of things products are small, networked and unfortunately have almost always little or no security. Sometimes this is down to a lack of willingness by the manufacturer but it is also partly due to the nature of the product – small and light also means that these devices have few resources for complex security features such as encryption and packet inspection. This leads to vulnerabilities, numerous attack vectors and ultimately to a bot device which can be abused by almost anyone. Following the latest large-scale attacks that primarily use IoT devices as a digital army there is a loud demand from those who want more legislation and governments to get involved. In a hearing before the Committee on Energy and Commerce of the US House of Representatives, the security guru Bruce Schneier stated that “catastrophic risks” would arise through the proliferation of insecure technology on the Internet.

Protecting virtual worlds of data in motion

In 2017, 69% of all applications will reside in the cloud according to Cisco. As we rely increasingly on benefits made possible by further advances in Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) and mobile devices, it’s a statistic that will continue to rise. The challenge for enterprises today is how to protect data as it streams constantly between physical mobile/IIoT devices to virtual repositories in the cloud and back again. Until corporate IT departments fully manage and stay on top of security, large breaches will continue to make the headlines. Statistics revealed in the Ponemon Institute 2016 Global Cloud Data Security Study show there is still much to do. The study found that nearly half (49%) of cloud services in the enterprise are outside corporate IT’s domain, while around 47% of corporate data stored in cloud environments are not managed by the IT department.

Does more surveillance offer more protection?

The trend towards greater state surveillance has become even more obvious since Edward Snowden’s revelations. Governments frequently justify such invasions of their citizens’ privacy as counterterrorism or anti-pedophile measures. In recent weeks, two unmissable examples of state interference have been hurried through including an amendment to Rule 41 of the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure in America and the Investigatory Powers Bill by Theresa May. Both laws permit or legalize massive invasions of privacy. Nobody is questioning the presence of a criminal threat – whatever it may be motivated by. However changes to legislation will weaken the security of many IT products which is already under heavy fire as demonstrated by current events such as the Google hack or attack on Telekom routers in Germany.