Back to Basics: Tackling the Fundamental Cybersecurity Solutions [VIDEO]

It’s fair to say that organizations, particularly larger enterprises, are making more concerted efforts nowadays to invest heavily and quickly into cybersecurity. Just a few short years ago, businesses were content with treating cybersecurity as something frivolous, an optional add-on; a cyberattack couldn’t possibly happen to you, right? And yet, in a short amount of time, we’ve seen the rate of cyberattacks and data breaches explode, both in frequency and impact. Seemingly no one is outside the firing sights of hackers: enterprises, SMBs, government agencies, individuals; all are fair game and have been targeted without impunity. That kind of fear has lit a fire under previously complacent organizations now looking to ramp up their cybersecurity game. But not all enterprises – and especially SMBs, which have comparatively fewer IT resources to work with – know exactly how to translate that urgency into action. They know they want solutions that are easy to use, easy to implement and get the job done – but where do you start? What’s ground zero for company cybersecurity? It’s a fundamental question, and one that many organizations often neglect – to their own detriment – in the rush to become more secure. They end up effectively putting the cart before the horse, missing some of the fundamentals of cybersecurity that, if left unaddressed, become significant threat factors. The 2015 Global Threat Intelligence Report, released by NTT Com Security, highlights just how bad this awareness gap has become, noting that 76 percent of the vulnerabilities in an enterprise’s cybersecurity strategy had been there for two-and-a-half years – and almost 10 percent had been present for...

A Look at BYOD in 2016

Happy 2016! It’s a new year, and a time for fresh resolutions to improve your life over the next 12 months, whether that involves running a marathon, getting a new job or taking that trip abroad you’ve been putting off. But for businesses, those New Year’s resolutions should be expressly focused on stronger security. With data breaches, email hacks and password thefts becoming more and more commonplace – and each cyberattack casting wider nets of victims – this is one resolution that can’t be allowed to fall through. This is especially true for organizations adopting BYOD and mobile-friendly policies. Just as developers have taken a “mobile first” approach to creating new apps – designing and optimizing apps from the ground up for mobile viewing and touchscreen interfaces – companies have begun taking the same approach to how their employees operate, whether it’s by allowing them to use their own personal devices in the workplace or utilizing either personal or company-owned devices while working remotely. As CIO.com points out, it’s important that this strategy pays special attention to security. Integrating more wireless and mobile devices into your company may make employees’ lives easier and more convenient, but it can open up serious potential security vulnerabilities if the proper precautions aren’t in place. A secure remote access VPN paired with cybersecurity policies like multi-factor authentication can help defend mobile communications – and protect the personal and corporate data that those communications send back and forth – from external threats. A New Year’s Resolution for Stronger Mobile Security As BNDA notes in its top 10 IT predictions for 2016, more than half...

Open Haus: Seamless Roaming [VIDEO]

Imagine this: You’re sitting on the train, trying to get your work done, when your Wi-Fi connection – not always the most reliable on trains – drops out. Maybe you manage to re-connect in a few minutes. Maybe you switch to your data plan to get back online. Or, maybe when the train gets close enough to a station, you can switch to their hotspot, and save some data in the process. Over the course of that trip, you had to cycle through different networks to maintain an internet connection, constantly losing any sessions you had running and forcing any apps you were using to restart. Not only that, but when end users have to switch that often between connections, it can make re-connecting to a VPN slow or frustrating, and they may opt to forgo the VPN altogether if those issues persist. It’s an understandable concern of inconvenience – after all, frequent network disruptions can make working remotely virtually impossible. But indulging in that concern can also dredge up even more problematic security issues. Users shouldn’t have to choose between network convenience and VPN security.   How It Works With NCP engineering’s Secure Enterprise Solution they don’t have to. The on-the-go demands of today’s mobile workers, who need reliable internet connections wherever they may be and also require the secure remote access provided by a VPN, make seamless roaming a prerequisite for how to stay both online and secure nowadays – and it’s a prerequisite built into NCP’s VPN solutions. While users may shift from one connection or IP address to the next, depending on where they are...

Endpoint Security: The Cornerstone of the Cybersecurity Puzzle

Some enterprises occasionally fail to realize that many of the differing cybersecurity services available today aren’t optional add-ons but necessary, oftentimes critical, pieces of a complete security strategy. There are a suite of unique security protocols and services that all work together to protect a network and safeguard valuable business data from intrusion. Cybersecurity is a holistic process that requires multiple moving parts working in tandem; failure to do so could leave networks with painful vulnerabilities, not to mention wasted resources. Endpoint security is one such critical piece of the cybersecurity puzzle. While it’s difficult to rank security systems in order of importance, it’s hard to imagine any of the other measures used to secure a network being functional without this one in place. It works like this: Endpoint security is installed on a client/server and may be managed by a central server, or gateway, that runs a security program to verify a network device. VPN and anti-virus software installed on an approved system requires the user to comply with policies before accessing the network. Without the permissions, a user can’t get into the shared network. Without this safeguard in place at the outset of network access, it’s hard to imagine many of the other potential security systems being fully capable of doing their job. Endpoint security is a proactive prevention method, while almost all other security systems are reactive, after-the fact measures. Incident response, for instance, functions as damage control. If endpoint security isn’t in place, the likelihood of a data breach happening is higher all around. An incident response strategy can’t predict a security failure ahead of...

‘Tis the Season: Why Cyberattackers Set their Sights on the Holidays

The holiday shopping season is back again and now in full gear. With Black Friday and Cyber Monday kicking off the annual frenzy, shoppers are already rummaging through department stores or scouring online marketplaces like Amazon to find that perfect gift – and ideally, at the perfect price too. The ecommerce side of the season is expected to be especially successful this year, with online sales predicted to jump 14 percent over the last holiday season, accounting for over $70 billion and approximately 9 percent of all U.S. retail sales. It’s great news for shoppers, great news for businesses and, unfortunately, great news for hackers too. The busy season makes December a more opportune time for cyberattackers to strike than the rest of the year. Remember Target’s data breach? Over 70 million customer records were compromised, including 30 to 40 million credit and debit cards, all at the peak of the 2013 holiday shopping season – ensuring there were plenty of potential victims and transactions for hackers to leech off of. Much like tax season, the holiday shopping season involves so much exchanging of personal and financial information while buying products and attempting to land deals that this time of year becomes a gold mine for cyberattackers. But it’s not just the shopping side of things that makes people vulnerable to cyberattacks; it’s all the vacation time too. Because as much as the holidays should mean taking some time off from work, not all of us can disconnect from it completely – especially with the option to view work emails on our phone, anywhere and at any time. But...

Missing the Forest for the Trees: How Cyberattacks in the News Can Mask the Threat to SMBs [VIDEO]

Cyberattacks and data breaches have been making headlines more and more these last few years. Whether it was the 40 million customer credit and debit cards stolen from Target in 2013, the major email leak at Sony Pictures Entertainment in 2014 or the 22 million personnel records compromised in the federal Office of Personnel Management this year, it’s hard to deny we’re seeing an already troubling trend grow even bigger. But perhaps there’s an even more worrisome trend at play that is not only suffering a lack of media exposure, but is actually being exacerbated by that lack of coverage. Because while all of the above victims and plenty more – including Home Depot, Anthem, P.F. Chang’s and JPMorgan Chase – represented serious and major breaches of consumer or corporate information, they’re also all major enterprises. And you would be remiss to believe that only the biggest companies get taken down by cyberattackers, when, in fact, it’s the smaller businesses that often prove the most frequent and fruitful targets for hackers. A survey released by Nationwide Insurance revealed that approximately 80 percent of all small- to mid-sized businesses in the U.S. don’t have a cyberattack response plan in place. Additionally, 60 percent of all cyberattacks are targeted at these same SMBs. If this seems grossly disproportionate with the amount of news coverage given to hacked enterprises over SMBs, that’s because it is – and that’s exactly what cyberthieves are banking on. Because SMBs have fewer resources to work with, and are less likely to learn about cyberthreats to their business from the news, they end up lacking the tools...