Four Common Myths about VPNs

A Virtual Private Network (VPN) is a useful tool that encrypts data before it passes across the public Internet and then decrypts it when it reaches its destination. Rather like shutters on the windows of a house, it shields what goes on inside even though the outside can be seen by everyone in the street. The process, often referred to as tunneling, is particularly useful for businesses whose workers have to use the Internet in public places like coffee shops or airports. It is also helpful for those who want to keep confidential customer information or intellectual property safe from the prying eyes of hackers and spies. In 2017, the U.S. Trump administration overturned regulations preventing ISPs from making money from users’ browser data. At the same time in the UK, the Investigatory Powers Act served to increased government surveillance of Internet activity in response to a heightened threat of terrorism. Both led to a surge in interest in VPNs. A VPN is an established technology that has traditionally been seen as the province of technical specialists. Perhaps because of this, and in spite of VPN services becoming easier to deploy, a number of enduring myths persist.

Enabling Secure Remote Connectivity for Apple Devices

With over one billion active users worldwide, Apple continues to offer the most diverse product line from Apple Watches to Macs, to iPads and iPhones. As Apple’s 10 year anniversary approaches in September, big plans are in store for iOS 11 to bring new features to the iPhone and iPad this fall. While updates to the mobile operating system will enhance functionality, they will also bring additional security vulnerabilities into play that can expose personal data if it is not protected with proper security measures. For companies that have implemented a BYOD environment, iPhones and iPads must be monitored and secured with virtual private networks (VPNs) to avoid potential security breaches.

The Secret to Effective Remote Access VPN Management

The growing number of employees using multiple personal and company-owned mobile devices to connect to corporate networks is, according to Ponemon Institute, the biggest endpoint security threat today. In this environment, VPNs play a vital role in encrypting remote communications to keep sensitive and confidential company information exchanges secure and private. Large organizations may have many thousands of endpoint devices accessing the network at any given moment. Managing all these individual components is time-consuming and complex. However, a centralized remote access VPN management system can greatly simplify the process. The secret is in combining intelligence and automation to make remote access management as secure, efficient and productive as possible.

NCP Secure Enterprise iOS Client Wins Government Security Award

NCP has been named by Security Today magazine among the 2017 winners of its coveted Government Security Awards, also known as “The Govies”. The Govies recognize new security products across a spectrum of disciplines that share a common trait – they are all fundamentally important to IT professionals working in government agencies and their private sector partners. NCP is thrilled to receive top honors for its Secure Enterprise iOS Client, which took the Platinum award in the Network Security category. This achievement further underlines NCP’s dominance in Government remote access VPN solutions having triumphed in the same Govies category on numerous previous occasions.

Strategies for Managing Large-Scale VPN Deployments

Large organizations today are experiencing a rapid evolution in technology that is challenging traditional security systems and infrastructures. Corporate networks that once only had to support the connectivity of desk-bound workstations and a small number of laptops must now cope with thousands of laptops, tablets and phones along with a rapidly growing population of IIoT/M2M devices. VPNs are an integral part of any mobile device and IIoT security strategy. To manage all of these VPNs easily and efficiently without compromising end-user security requires the IT department to embrace a variety of strategies.

Side-step the Internet censorship threat

Most people in the Western world regard privacy as one of most fundamental rights in a democratic society. They also take it for granted that these democratic principles apply equally to the Internet. This is why the exposure of the NSA’s PRISM program in 2013 highlighting the extent of Internet surveillance by the US authorities was such a scandal.