Business Benefits of Staying Anonymous Online

A new report from UK anti-fraud organization Cifas shows identity theft at “epidemic levels”. From the present controversy over Net Neutrality to the openness of public Wi-Fi, personal information has seldom been more exposed. The Internet’s susceptibility to surveillance and cyber attacks compromises privacy, leading to concern in some quarters that it could ultimately erode public trust in our present way of life. Fortunately, most people believe tighter security standards and encryption are key reasons to be confident about the future. Virtual Private Network (VPN) software is a proven way for employers to ensure workers are secure and anonymous whenever they connect to the office over the public Internet. VPNs encrypt data passing between businesses and their employees, helping to shield company confidential information from fraudsters and other unwelcome onlookers.

Going on Holiday? Don’t Forget to Pack Your VPN

People have become accustomed to using their mobile devices for the dual purposes of business and leisure. Yet, research shows when they travel they don’t really give the data on their devices a second thought. Instead they are much more likely to care about whether the hotel or apartment they are staying at has good Wi-Fi access. This reliance on public Wi-Fi on holiday risks exposing any sensitive business information on personal devices to hackers and snoopers. For this reason, it is best to always take your VPN technology with you on holiday to encrypt all Internet communications while away.

Top Business Benefits of VPNs

President Donald Trump’s recent decision to overturn rules set by the Obama administration to stop Internet service providers (ISPs) from selling everyone’s browsing data to advertisers and other third parties has re-opened the Internet privacy debate. The development adds to existing concerns about the potential for hackers to intercept sensitive data when communicating with the office from home or out on the road. A Virtual Private Network (VPN) provides an encrypted connection for remote network access. This is a very effective way for businesses and individuals to prevent outsiders from intercepting sensitive data. There are a number of key business benefits for VPN.

Enabling Secure Remote Connectivity for Apple Devices

With over one billion active users worldwide, Apple continues to offer the most diverse product line from Apple Watches to Macs, to iPads and iPhones. As Apple’s 10 year anniversary approaches in September, big plans are in store for iOS 11 to bring new features to the iPhone and iPad this fall. While updates to the mobile operating system will enhance functionality, they will also bring additional security vulnerabilities into play that can expose personal data if it is not protected with proper security measures. For companies that have implemented a BYOD environment, iPhones and iPads must be monitored and secured with virtual private networks (VPNs) to avoid potential security breaches.

Winner Takes It All: Why Net Neutrality is a High Stakes Game

There’s an almighty tug-of-war going on between the telcos and the Web companies over Net Neutrality rules. It’s a contentious issue that divides two continents. The current US administration favors the telcos, while the EU wants an Internet that continues to encourage Web company innovation and protects consumer privacy rights. The stakes are high. Should the current rules change, then telcos and ISPs will no longer be obliged to treat all web content equally. It will mean Web companies may have to pay more to distribute their choicest content while the surfing habits and purchase histories of ordinary customers could be sold to the highest bidder. For customers who value their privacy, VPNs are a great way to avoid website traffic analysis and preserve secure Internet connectivity.

The next major incident is simply a matter of time

When WannaCry dominated the headlines, manufacturers fell over one another to make a statement. On the whole, the comments can be divided into two groups. Some reminded customers that not patching software is negligent and others claimed that it simply would not have happened with their software/hardware/service. How true is this? One can hardly imagine that organizations such as hospitals or Deutsche Bahn would not have any protection software, employ incompetent administrators, or have not heavily invested in security technology. Security products and services were almost certainly available to the affected organizations; however, they were unable to neutralize this threat.