Lack of encryption is putting customer data at risk

Security researchers investigating the Yahoo data breach believe that a failure to use proper encryption is one of the prime reasons behind the hack. If this is right, then many more organizations may be putting customer data at risk. A report by Gemalto and the Ponemon Institute found 92 percent of businesses encrypt just 75 percent or less of their sensitive and confidential data when it is sent via the cloud. The proportion of respondents that encrypt data stored in the cloud is even lower at 40 percent. Worryingly for customers, it is their data that is the most common form of information left unencrypted. This places customer data at considerable risk of being viewed or even harvested by hackers. A simple way of protecting cloud data on its journey from device to cloud storage is to encrypt the whole process using a VPN tunnel.

VPN and Bitcoin: A Cloak of Invisibility for Shoppers of Digital Goods

Bitcoin, the digital currency underpinned by block chain technology, is still in its infancy and users are only just beginning to scratch the surface of its full potential. Even so, things are already heating up for dealers in Bitcoin. This year, the total value of Bitcoin transactions is expected to exceed $92bn – up around 240% from under $27bn in 2015. Bitcoin transactions typically make use of aliases or nicknames to disguise user identities but this does not make them anonymous. However, the combination of a virtual private network (VPN) and Bitcoin can guarantee privacy. The encrypted connection provides a cloak of invisibility for all transactional data and provides complete anonymity for buyers if they want it. This is especially true when purchasing digital goods like software, books, reports, databases and so on.

Making IIoT Security More Robust

Once again Internet-connected gadgets, also known as the Internet of Things (IoT), are expected to be a gift for retailers this Christmas in helping them towards bumper sales. However, in many ways, the hyperbole surrounding consumer IoT is a mere side-show. According to McKinsey Global Institute, the real value of IoT lies with industry. McKinsey expects factories to be the top market for Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT), accounting for $3.7 trillion per year by 2025. Presently, IoT technology in general is relatively immature. Issues such as security and manufacturing standards are still the subject of much debate. However, the primary focus of the world’s professional engineering bodies is how to make IIoT more robust. In this respect, Virtual Private Network (VPN) technology has an important part to play by ensuring data traffic is secured at device-level and encrypted at all times.

Vote of confidence for IT security made in Germany

Where is your IT manufacturer based? What used to be a trivial matter of image has now become a security issue. Three years after Edward Snowden’s revelations, CEOs understandably feel uncomfortable when their IT infrastructure consists of routers and switches from different vendors. Some companies are known to have been affected by the efforts of the American National Security Agency (NSA) either through code manipulation or backdoors in certain products. In relation to these developments, the quality label of IT security made in Germany carries even more weight.

European Cyber Security Month – A month dedicated to cyber security

Most people claim to know how important IT security is. The reality is somewhat different. Demands on employees time are high, there are millions of distractions and somehow the backup at the end of the day is forgotten. A reminder of the many threats facing professional and personal data (and bank accounts) can come in useful. The European Cyber ​​Security Month (ECSM) is an entire month dedicated to promoting cyber security and will take place throughout Europe in October.

Smart buildings merit smarter security

Architects and city planners first began promoting the concept of Smart Buildings, or Building Automation Systems (BAS), around ten years ago. Smart buildings were meant to deliver untold benefits from energy efficiencies and greener lifestyles to cost savings and improved living standards for all. Early examples of IP-connected appliances, however, were not built to cope with the demands of an evolving threat landscape.