Protecting virtual worlds of data in motion

In 2017, 69% of all applications will reside in the cloud according to Cisco. As we rely increasingly on benefits made possible by further advances in Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) and mobile devices, it’s a statistic that will continue to rise. The challenge for enterprises today is how to protect data as it streams constantly between physical mobile/IIoT devices to virtual repositories in the cloud and back again. Until corporate IT departments fully manage and stay on top of security, large breaches will continue to make the headlines. Statistics revealed in the Ponemon Institute 2016 Global Cloud Data Security Study show there is still much to do. The study found that nearly half (49%) of cloud services in the enterprise are outside corporate IT’s domain, while around 47% of corporate data stored in cloud environments are not managed by the IT department.

Control over our data

Anybody who uses the Internet uses, creates and leaves data behind. While in the past site visits were recorded in the depths of server log files rarely to surface again, these and related data are now the currency of the 21st century. Services are exchanged for data, this is the business model shared by Google, Amazon and many others. But people are becoming more aware that the uninhibited acquisition of their personal data may have negative consequences and no longer trust that their data is protected on the Internet.

Cloud Security Pitfalls to Avoid

Cloud computing technology is fast becoming an attractive alternative to maintaining IT systems and applications on premise. In-house management and maintenance of IT is costly and resource-hungry. Small and medium-sized businesses in particular benefit from the way cloud services give them access to greater processing power and IT expertise than they could ever aspire to with the modest budgets and resources of their own. Cloud computing also provides an opportunity for large organizations to enjoy economies of scale for the high data volumes produced by the many and various devices, operating systems and applications they use.

Why Outsourcing Remote Access Management Isn’t the Answer for SMBs

“How do you keep your data secure when you’re a data anchovy in a sea of hacker sharks?” When the Wall Street Journal’s John Bussey posed this question in 2011, the corporate network security landscape was drastically different. Employees weren’t using company-managed smartphones at a rate of 64 percent. Nine out of every 10 employees weren’t keeping sensitive business information on devices they use for both work and personal matters. Yet, even then, SMB network administrators were concerned about their security, and feeling like vulnerable little fish with bigger, more aggressive fish circling. So concerned, in fact, that according to Bussey, many were reluctant to outsource network security services to a managed service provider (MSP), even though these companies would have both the expertise and resources required to keep their networks safe. At the time, many SMBs thought that the “hard disk under the receptionist’s desk” strategy was more effective than handing over control to a third party, even though these MSPs could provide data encryption, threat mitigation and other critical security services. SMBs thought to themselves: “Yes, but what if the host isn’t entirely well-protected? Or what if a peer company within the shared environment was attacked? Or what if hackers prioritized these target-rich environments?” These were real concerns then, and they still are now. So, should network administrators consider tapping into MSPs for network security in our current environment? The core issue is a common one in network security – convenience vs. security. The Debate The convenience vs. security debate comes to how SMBs go about securing communications. On one hand, SMBs could opt for convenience and...

The Cloud is Covered: VPNs Enhance Data Security in the Cloud

Cloud computing not only introduces a new level of flexibility for enterprise IT services, but it often improves data security, too. A cloud provider that has to adhere to stringent privacy and compliance regulations typically has more know-how and access to more resources than a small- or medium-size company. But it is just not possible to rely on a cloud provider for every aspect of data security. In the end, the company is responsible for its own data. Many aspects of data security are beyond the purview of the cloud provider, but at least it is responsible for checking all certificates and knowing which ones are relevant. However, all basic security measures are the responsibility of the company. Among them is the protection of the data-in-transit between the company’s LAN and the data center in the cloud. The easiest way to ensure this protection is to use a location-to-location VPN tunnel. If a VPN solution is already being used, the company has to make sure there aren’t any compatibility issues between its VPN gateway and the gateway at the cloud provider’s site. The VPN standards IPsec and SSL have been in use for many years and are tried and trusted, greatly reducing the potential for trouble. Usually the cloud data center provides a virtual machine on which the company installs another instance of its VPN gateway solution. Major solution providers like Microsoft Azure, Amazon Web Services and Google Compute Engine provide extensive how-to guides and online manuals explaining how to assure compatibility with a VPN. Most providers even relieve the customer of that process by offering a turnkey, managed...

A Closer Look at Cloud VPNs

Virtual Private Networks as a Service (VPNaaS), Managed Security Service Providers (MSSP) and Cloud Remote Access are different solutions addressing the same market requirement – the ability for remote employees to securely access corporate networks via the Internet with a managed solution.  Many enterprises have realized the benefits of using cloud services in other areas of their IT infrastructure. As a result, they no longer want to absorb the costs and management effort involved in hosting their own VPN gateways, especially ones with large numbers of remote endpoints. Striking a balance between giving remote employees the flexibility they desire while ensuring sensitive company data remains secure is admittedly a fine line to walk. Enterprises have faced that challenge for several years now as they’ve wrestled with the bring-your-own-device (BYOD) movement. Factoring the cloud into the equation only compounds the complexity of the situation. That’s why many companies today are outsourcing the operation of the VPN to a cloud solutions provider such as HOSTING. However, not all VPNs are created equal, and enterprises need to carefully examine what a provider is offering. What to look for Be sure the provider offers simple, yet efficient management of your cloud-based VPN. For example, centrally managed VPNs give administrators the ability to easily set up, add or dele te users as needed. With this approach, all configuration parameters are centrally stored. This approach makes it substantially easier for end users to establish connections while making it nearly impossible for employees to bypass or manipulate them. Will end users need to reestablish a secure network connection each time their connection channel changes? If the...