Encryption is Central to EU GDPR’s Demand for Privacy

Starting May 2018, any business offering goods and services to EU citizens will have to comply with new GDPR rules. These rules explicitly require companies to take all measures necessary to protect the integrity of consumer data that they process or store. A key principle of GDPR is “privacy by default” which requires the digital information in everything from emails and mobile apps to cloud storage systems and M2M communications to be kept private and secure at all times. Studies show that U.S. organizations are no less committed to compliance as those in the EU. One of the most powerful protection measures a company can take is to encrypt data at every stage – in use, in motion and in storage. A tried and tested way to transport sensitive personal data securely across public networks is via business-grade VPNs. VPNs provide an encrypted tunnel to communicate privately between email and mobile connections as well as internal databases and cloud storage facilities.

The Rise of Cloud-based Services Fuels Demand for Managed VPNs

The growing popularity of cloud services coupled with security concerns is driving demand for managed VPNs. In particular, the success of public cloud services is gradually encouraging more enterprises to move away from conventional remote network access methods in favor of cloud-based remote access. Providing remote access via the public cloud brings organizations multiple advantages including ease of management, flexibility and lower costs. However, opinions are divided over the level of security it affords. Most users of public cloud services consider security a primary benefit. Yet mistakes can and do happen, leading to high profile consequences. One aspect of cloud management technology that is not in dispute is its capacity to simplify secure VPN connectivity for large numbers of remote workers.

How to Enable a Secure Cloud VPN

Cloud computing has been around now for about a decade. It offers companies the chance to lease computing resources and services on-demand over the Internet from cloud services providers. In this way, companies gain the freedom to quickly scale IT systems up and down in line with changing business circumstances as well as keep up with the latest technology advances. The cloud services model is also a lot more cost effective than equivalent in-house deployments. Yet, despite all of this, many organizations still hesitate to embrace cloud services citing remote access security concerns, especially when employees are connecting to cloud applications when on the road. To address such concerns, providers can offer their customers remote access out of the cloud or VPN as a service.

IIoT, Mobile and Cloud Security Take Center Stage at RSAC 2017

The RSA Conference (RSAC) is always a major highlight in the IT security professional calendar and this year’s show was no exception. In this blog, NCP engineering reviews some of the standout enterprise machine-to-machine (M2M), mobile client and cloud security trends to emerge from RSAC 2017. The show is also a win-win for NCP. Our strong track record with US technology partners means that NCP is well-known to US-base customers and prospects. At the same time, our experience in fulfilling Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) or Industry 4.0 projects in Germany means we had a great deal of knowledge and insight to share with prospects in this security segment, one that is in its early stages in the United States.

Protecting virtual worlds of data in motion

In 2017, 69% of all applications will reside in the cloud according to Cisco. As we rely increasingly on benefits made possible by further advances in Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) and mobile devices, it’s a statistic that will continue to rise. The challenge for enterprises today is how to protect data as it streams constantly between physical mobile/IIoT devices to virtual repositories in the cloud and back again. Until corporate IT departments fully manage and stay on top of security, large breaches will continue to make the headlines. Statistics revealed in the Ponemon Institute 2016 Global Cloud Data Security Study show there is still much to do. The study found that nearly half (49%) of cloud services in the enterprise are outside corporate IT’s domain, while around 47% of corporate data stored in cloud environments are not managed by the IT department.

Control over our data

Anybody who uses the Internet uses, creates and leaves data behind. While in the past site visits were recorded in the depths of server log files rarely to surface again, these and related data are now the currency of the 21st century. Services are exchanged for data, this is the business model shared by Google, Amazon and many others. But people are becoming more aware that the uninhibited acquisition of their personal data may have negative consequences and no longer trust that their data is protected on the Internet.