Winner Takes It All: Why Net Neutrality is a High Stakes Game

There’s an almighty tug-of-war going on between the telcos and the Web companies over Net Neutrality rules. It’s a contentious issue that divides two continents. The current US administration favors the telcos, while the EU wants an Internet that continues to encourage Web company innovation and protects consumer privacy rights. The stakes are high. Should the current rules change, then telcos and ISPs will no longer be obliged to treat all web content equally. It will mean Web companies may have to pay more to distribute their choicest content while the surfing habits and purchase histories of ordinary customers could be sold to the highest bidder. For customers who value their privacy, VPNs are a great way to avoid website traffic analysis and preserve secure Internet connectivity.

The summer holiday season brings extra risk for restaurants and hotel chains

US retailers have been having a tough time of late. Shifting consumer tastes and the rise of online shopping have forced a number of stores to cease trading. While conventional stores may not be hiring for the summer like they used to, there’s still plenty of seasonal work to be found in hotels, restaurants and the hospitality sector in general. Restaurants and hotels are already popular targets for cybercrime. On top of this, the busy summer season brings an influx of newbies to join the workforce, adding an extra risk dimension for employers to deal with. From remote Point-of-Sale connectivity, to summer season workers using their mobile phones to look up or share company information, hospitality chains need a comprehensive VPN strategy so they can be assured that sensitive data remains private and secure.

The next major incident is simply a matter of time

When WannaCry dominated the headlines, manufacturers fell over one another to make a statement. On the whole, the comments can be divided into two groups. Some reminded customers that not patching software is negligent and others claimed that it simply would not have happened with their software/hardware/service. How true is this? One can hardly imagine that organizations such as hospitals or Deutsche Bahn would not have any protection software, employ incompetent administrators, or have not heavily invested in security technology. Security products and services were almost certainly available to the affected organizations; however, they were unable to neutralize this threat.