Seamless Roaming or Always On: The Remote Access VPN Feature Digital Nomads May Be Missing

In remote working environments, the Digital Nomad isn’t tied to a desk or cubicle, but he has close relationships with his coworkers. The Digital Nomad works exclusively from mobile devices that connect wirelessly to the Internet, and she’s still able to finish all her tasks on time. For now, these workers are generally the exception to the rule, but that may not be the case for much longer. One-third of business leaders anticipate that by 2020, more than half of their full-time workforce will be working remotely. It’s not difficult to see why remote work is so popular. Today, Digital Nomads can be more nomadic than ever, setting up new mobile “offices” wherever there’s a network connection. They don’t even need a hard surface to put their device on or an outlet to plug into. But, what they do need for security purposes is a remote access VPN to enable a secure connection back to the corporate network. VPNs are reliable, but the problem is, network interruptions have long seemed inevitable. They get in the way and disrupt the user’s computing session. That’s when a VPN feature known as seamless roaming or always on comes into play, allowing a user to move between different networks without losing the connection. The Value of Seamless Roaming Whether you’re a finance executive fighting dead zones as you work on your laptop from a train, or a sales professional working from an airport across a spotty Wi-Fi connection, each time there’s a network disruption, the user has to manually restart the VPN connection to continue working. This is why seamless roaming is no...

NCP engineering Earns ‘Champion’ Rating in techconsult Report

This year, cyberattacks are expected to rain down at a rate of more than 117,000 per day, adding up to more than 42.8 million total incidents. As these attacks are launched and subsequently investigated, the root cause of many of them will turn out to be the result of employee action – basic human error – such as accidentally violating a remote access policy. With these figures in mind, the new report “Security Solution Vendors 2015,” conducted by German analyst firm techconsult, analyzes the entire network, data, storage and endpoint security landscape, while identifying top providers and solutions that are on the front lines protecting businesses from these 42.8 million attacks. The report bodes well for NCP engineering and our remote access VPN solutions. Techconsult found that NCP “dominates” the network security space, while highlighting how NCP’s Secure Enterprise Solution “win…clearly against the competition” from other VPN solution providers. This assessment is reflected by NCP’s presence in the “Champion” quadrant, comprising all security solution vendors, based on evaluations from the market and users, as well as experts. NCP also earns a “Champion” rating when only network security vendors – those with VPN, external firewalls and Unified Threat Management (UTM) solutions – are assessed. NCP is the top solution provider in this quadrant, and we stand out for our 100 percent user satisfaction rating. In the Virtual Private Network quadrant, NCP again earns top marks and a “Champion” rating, with the report noting, “NCP has been able to set itself above the rest with the experts’ evaluations based on its excellent solution assessment as well as its company-specific framework conditions.”...

How One Challenging Gig with My Band Prepared Me for a Career in Cybersecurity

Sometimes, connections between work and play appear when they’re least expected. You wouldn’t expect, for example, a guitar-shredding metal-head to carry over much from his time on stage to his career in cybersecurity, but that’s exactly what happened to Julian Weinberger, CISSP and Director of Systems Engineering for NCP engineering. Julian isn’t performing in the U.S. anymore, but during his time in Germany, one gig in particular brought so many challenges that he still thinks about it today. We sat down with Julian to discuss what happened that night. What specific event involving your band has taught you the most about working in security and business continuity? A few years ago, after hustling to line up free gigs, I landed my first paid performance. Unfortunately, I ran into myriad unanticipated issues: a string on my first guitar broke, my backup guitar didn’t work, my cable made weird noises, and, as if that wasn’t enough, my in-ear system stopped working. Although none of these issues were my fault, they wreaked havoc on the gig – and when you’re hired to entertain, you risk not being paid if you’re unable to deliver, regardless of the circumstances. It’s similar with enterprise network security. If things break — and they will — you need to be prepared with a plan to fix it. So how did you respond on stage? And what did that teach you about security? When performing on stage, technical difficulties must be fixed within seconds, and it’s the same case with security. For instance, if your microphone cuts out – or worse, your organization is faced with security issues...

Open Haus: Automatic Hotspot Logon

If you were a hacker targeting a network, which would be most appealing – a network contained in a residential building, an office or corporate facility, or a public place? The information contained on the network of a residential building probably wouldn’t be particularly valuable, and it would also be well-protected. You’d face even more security if trying to attack a corporate network, so that probably wouldn’t be your best option either. You’d probably target a public network – one in an airport, coffee shop or hotel – over which users dealing with sensitive information would try to connect, perhaps without having the same security protections they would have if they were in their home or office. Public networks can be vulnerable, and they do make popular targets. Consider all the possible threats – from snooping and evil twin schemes to narrowband jamming and replay attacks – hackers can deploy against these networks. It’s also important to consider that there are now many more public hotspots than there were even a few years ago – global Wi-Fi hotspots are expected to triple from 1.3 million in 2011 to 5.8 million this year. For business users in particular, hotspot connections are ideal for when they’re at day-long events (when using mobile data on their phone or tablet would quickly drain their battery) or when they travel abroad (to avoid costly roaming fees). For these users, and for anyone else who relies on hotspots for secure remote access, NCP engineering has integrated Automatic Hotspot Logon into its NCP Secure Client. How It Works A safeguard protecting the end device against attack...

OPM Breach Shows Need for ‘Nimble’ Government Network Security

No matter how you look at it, the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) is on the hook for revealing the records of millions of Americans. The only question is how many millions. If you believe the agency’s own report, then it’s 4 million. Four million current, former and prospective government employees whose personal information became public following a cyberattack conducted throughout the early part of this year. The numbers are even worse if the reports from the Associated Press, Bloomberg and other prominent news sources are accurate. They claim the number of victims is closer to 14 million. Although the OPM investigation is still ongoing, the federal government has already begun the task of investigating and explaining the attack. As White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest told reporters last week: “Protecting the computer networks of the federal government is a daunting challenge. It does require the federal government to be nimble, something that’s difficult when you’re talking about an organization that’s this large.” Earnest is right. When you’re talking about the federal government as one body, it’s difficult to imagine it being fleet-of-foot and responding effectively to new and emerging cyberthreats. On a smaller scale, though, there are plenty of government agencies, at all levels, that are getting the job done locally, and taking proactive steps that should prevent them from becoming the next OPM. Let’s look at one government agency in Iowa that’s upgraded its remote access and, in the process, is protecting its network. Read Case Study Lessons from the Heartland Iowa Vocational Rehabilitation Services (IVRS) is a state agency, headquartered in Des Moines, that partners with...