[WEBINAR] Two-Factor Authentication for Tighter VPN Security

If you think that passwords for online profiles are effective at preventing security breaches, consider these two new statistics: The average person has 19 passwords Four in five people say they forget their passwords To counter password forgetfulness, users often take steps that leave network administrators cringing. They may duplicate one password over multiple accounts. They could use birthdays or other numbers that can be easily guessed. Or they might write them down, sometimes in plain sight. Actions like these make it that much easier for attackers to successfully breach a network, and indeed, many recent breaches share a common origin – an employee’s password that was copied, discovered or given away. To counter this wave of password theft, an avalanche of popular sites and apps, including Google, Amazon, Facebook and now even Snapchat, have replaced one-dimensional passwords with a form of user login credentials that help better protect sensitive information. Download Whitepaper Enter two-factor authentication. This approach combines two (or more) methods of credentials authentication to establish the unambiguous identification of each user, including: Something Users Know: Password, PIN, one-time password (OTP), certificate Something Users Have: Token or calculator (with OTP), soft token, text message (with OTP), machine/hardware certificate, smartcard, trusted platform module (TPM) Something Users Are: Fingerprint, face recognition, iris recognition, keystroke dynamics Network administrators have all these options at their disposal, and the idea is to pick at least one form of authentication from two of the lists. An administrator may even pick a factor from all three lists, or combine multiple items from each. With this additional protection, users gain the convenience of anywhere-anytime access without...

NCP Channel Alliance Partner Program Takes Center Stage at Channel Link 2015

Given that three in four executives now say Bring-Your-Own-Device (BYOD) initiatives pose the greatest security risk to their companies, it shouldn’t be surprising that companies have tasked their IT departments with finding effective ways to guarantee secure remote access for users. Often, this means network administrators have to identify partner vendors that can provide secure remote access solutions, including VPNs. Here at NCP engineering, we’ve heard enough customer success stories to know that our NCP Secure Entry Clients are the centerpiece around which any remote access infrastructure should be built. That’s why we’re proud to be attending Tech Data’s Channel Link 2015, June 17-20, in Dallas, where we’ll be sharing information about our Channel Alliance Partner Program. The program, which has been in place since 2009, now includes 42 North American partners – 14 of which are new – that are able to access services from NCP, including business transformation training, advice on how to better incorporate cloud solutions into their current offerings, and training to simplify hosting and managed services concepts. NCP’s appearance at Channel Link comes just a few months after we reached a distribution agreement with Tech Data, one of the world’s largest wholesale distributors of technology products. Through the agreement, NCP is better able to meet demand from North American service providers in the channel for secure remote access. Specifically, end users are able to tap into our market-leading remote access VPN client, equipped with one-click logon, a fast connection, and always-on reliability. Together, the Channel Alliance Partner Program that we’ll be featuring at Channel Link, along with the Tech Data agreement, showcase NCP’s ability...

Two’s (or More) Company: How to Use Two-Factor Authentication the Right Way

These days, you need a password to access every aspect of your digital life, and we all know how problematic that can be. You can either come up with a unique (albeit difficult-to-remember) password for every website, or use easy passwords, or even duplicates, that leave your accounts insecure. Fortunately, many prominent websites today – Dropbox, Google, Apple, Facebook and PayPal – all support a security approach known as two-factor or multi-factor authentication. And it’s easy to see why. This process enhances security by adding another step (or more) to the user verification process, making even risky passwords much stronger. That’s because in addition to the factor that a user knows (a password), every login attempt requires the user to supply a factor he or she owns, such as a one-time access code or PIN sent to their mobile device via SMS text or email, and/or one that reflects who they are, like a fingerprint. Through this relatively simple extension of the traditional authentication scheme, a lost or stolen password becomes plain useless to a hacker. No successful login is possible without the additional factor or factors. If your security demands are higher than average, it’s also important to generate the second authentication code, or OTP, only when the user has already started the session and the first factor has been exchanged successfully. It might be simpler to implement and roll out tokens with pre-fabricated codes, but this kind of implementation is inherently easier to compromise, but is still almost impossible to break. As a rule, token solutions require a seed that contains the base data for generating the...