Open Haus: Wi-Fi and Seamless Roaming for Mobile Workers

When you hear the term “mobile worker,” what image comes to mind? Is it the employee who is constantly taking his laptop into different corners of the office, working from their desk, conference rooms and couches? Or is it the “road warrior” executive who works from airports, trains, cafés, hotels and anywhere else she can find a Wi-Fi or 3G/4G connection? Whatever you picture, the fact is that mobility is now a key expectation of many employees. Those who work from laptops, tablets and other mobile devices need to be certain that the technology they depend on is able to follow them from place to place, without any service interruption. As an example, remote workers often use a VPN to securely connect to their corporate network, no matter their location. But what happens if their network connection changes? Imagine an employee who works on her laptop while commuting by train, but constantly loses her Wi-Fi connection as she travels. You’d think that every time the network connection switches between Wi-Fi and 4G, she would need to log into her VPN. The employee would get frustrated and not be nearly as productive. To avoid this scenario and others that impede mobile working, NCP engineering developed two key additions to its Remote Access VPN solution – Wi-Fi roaming and seamless roaming. With these features, the VPN tunnel connection is constantly maintained without disrupting the user’s computing session, even if their network connection changes. Here’s how these two features enhance NCP engineering’s Remote Access VPN solution: Wi-Fi Roaming Say a remote worker moves within the range of several wireless access points using...

How to Manage Secure Communications in M2M Environments

For all the talk of the Internet of Things (IoT) and machine-to-machine (M2M) communications making our lives easier, there always seems to be a cautionary tale involving security of these devices around every corner. Take self-driving cars – something it seems like almost everyone would want. That is, until last summer, when the cybersecurity community raised a red flag around connected cars, and the possibility that hackers could tap into a vehicle’s network and disrupt its operating system. The same concerns have followed connected televisions. As of a year ago, smart TVs had taken over about one-third of the flat-screen television market. Then, just last week, news outlets picked up on the possibility that Samsung’s smart televisions could effectively “eavesdrop” on conversations, and that the company could then pass that information along to third parties. Although these specific examples are recent, questions about network security in M2M communications and the IoT are not new. ZDNet flagged the issue back in January 2013, in an article that posited security concerns could prevent M2M from reaching its full potential. REGISTER FOR WEBINAR Although M2M communications have actually been common for decades, they have never before been quite as widespread as they are now, and they now communicate over the open, public Internet, versus being confined to limited, secure networks. As NetIQ’s Ian Yip told ZDNet, in many cases security is an afterthought – it is something that is a “retrofit” to M2M. This is a mistake. Security needs to be considered from the very beginning. M2M security is already difficult enough, as human beings aren’t even part of the communications process....

Europe: More than Just ‘Stumbling Forward’ to Improved Cybersecurity

Two years ago almost to the day, months before cyberattacks entered the world’s collective consciousness, the European Union took the bold step of publishing an ambitious cybersecurity strategy. The strategy aims to outline the best path forward for identifying and responding to emerging digital threats. Orchestrators of the plan, “An Open, Safe and Secure Cyberspace,” believed that it would be a central step towards creating an environment in which the digital economy could thrive, having so far been largely isolated from attacks but known to be vulnerable. As the European Commission’s Catherine Ashton said, “For cyberspace to remain open and free, the same norms, principles and values that the EU upholds offline, should also apply online.” Since its inception in 2013, the EU’s Cybersecurity Strategy has focused on five pillars, namely: Achieving cyber resilience Reducing cyber crime Building cyber defense policies Deploying new cybersecurity technologies Creating a central international cybersecurity policy. Even in this short period of time, significant strides have been made towards adoption. The NIS Directive has been a cornerstone piece of legislation resulting from the plan. It requires EU member states to adopt a national strategy that “sets out concrete policy and regulatory measures to maintain a level of network and information security.” The Directive also requires private entities to disclose major cyberattacks. As Defense One points out, this amount of progress is no small feat, as institutions within the EU generally “stumble forward” because of the fragmentation that is inherent to the union. In the case of the Cybersecurity Strategy, three separate EU institutions – the Directorate General for Home Affairs, the European Council and European External Action...

White House Turns Attention to Cybersecurity

Cyberattackers and hackers operate in the shadows, lurking away from where conventional law enforcement can easily identify and investigate them. They prefer secrecy and anonymity. But they may not have that luxury any longer – not since the federal government and the White House, specifically, have escalated their focus on cybersecurity. First, President Barack Obama addressed the issue during his State of the Union address earlier this month, declaring, “No foreign nation, no hacker, should be able to shut down our networks, steal our trade secrets, or invade the privacy of American families, especially our kids.” To back up his comments, the president also submitted a budget proposal that allocates funding toward combating cyberattacks. In the initial proposal, the president called for cybersecurity spending to increase by 10 percent to $14 billion – all in an effort to improve detection of and response to the kinds of massive attacks that have plagued both the public and private sector over the last year. Specifically, the budget proposal calls for: Improved data sharing Increased monitoring and diagnostics of federal computer networks More widespread deployment of the EINSTEIN intrusion detection and prevention system Government-wide testing and incident-response training New teams of engineers and technology consultants In the White House’s explanation of these budget items, it said, “Cyber threats targeting the private sector, critical infrastructure and the federal government demonstrate that no sector, network or system is immune to infiltration by those seeking to steal commercial or government secrets and property or perpetrate malicious and disruptive activity.” The cybersecurity community has largely lauded the budget and the government’s increased attention to the issue,...