Two-Factor Authentication Transforms Even ‘123456’ Into a Secure Password

Since 2011, the same two passwords have ranked as the most common (and worst) among users. Care to take a guess as to what they are? You don’t have to be a savvy hacker to figure them out – “123456” and “password” have again topped the list this year. The good news is the prevalence of these two passwords in particular has fallen quite a bit, from 8.5 percent of all passwords in 2011 to less than 1 percent now. As a password to an individual’s Facebook or Tumblr account, these are probably adequate. The accounts they’re “protecting” are low-profile, unlikely targets, and hackers wouldn’t really gain much from breaking into them anyway. It’s a different story when a user sets up a work-related email or credit card account – much more likely targets of attackers – using these easy-to-crack passwords. Instead of using brute force and repeatedly trying passwords, hackers barely have to break a sweat or exert any effort. They can simply type in “1-2-3-4-5-6” or “p-a-s-s-w-o-r-d” and they’ll be granted entry on their first try. A gold mine of information suddenly materializes right at their fingertips. At first glance, network administrators appear to have a few different courses of action to prevent these types of weak passwords and shore up their network security. They could try employee education – teaching their workforce best practices when it comes to setting up their credentials. Or they could provide them with tools that both randomly generate secure passwords and then store them securely for easy recall. The problem with each of these solutions is that they’re really just temporary...

Battlefield Mobile: Threats Targeting In-Motion Endpoints Climbed in 2014

By now, cybersecurity veterans are well-versed in the most common attack vectors exploited by hackers to breach their corporate networks. Brute force attacks, phishing schemes, SQL injections – they’re all proven attack methods that network administrators prepare for and defend against. But what about the next frontier? What attack vectors and endpoints do hackers now think are most vulnerable? It starts with mobile devices. They look like the perfect target to many attackers, who think that they can exploit the fact that so many connections over these endpoints go unsecured and that these devices are so popular with employees – 74 percent of organizations use or plan to use BYOD. In addition to mobile, another frontier could be devices that rely on machine-to-machine (M2M) communications, which create a scenario where human beings are entirely removed from the equation. As this small, isolated group of attack targets grows, network administrators need to be ready to fight back wherever hackers go, whether that’s on the mobile, M2M or some other battlefield. The Next Trends in Cybercrime The landscape of cyberthreats network administrators must be aware of is ever-evolving with the advent of new technologies and new criminal strategies. While there’s consensus in the security industry that mobile attacks will only increase in the coming years, the current prevalence of these incidents is really in the eye of the beholder. Only about 15 million mobile devices were infected by malware midway through 2014 – an infection rate of less than 1 percent. On the other hand, in the last year, mobile malware attacks did increase by 75 percent, off the back of...

The Risk Within: Could an Ex-Employee Be Responsible for the Sony Hack?

One month ago, we asked, “What network security lessons can we learn from the Sony attack?” Since then, new information has been slow to trickle out, save for the FBI’s mid-December statement that assigned responsibility to the North Korean government. Despite the seeming finality of that announcement, many in the cybersecurity community are still not convinced of North Korea’s sole culpability. In fact, some have even gone as far as to construct counter-narratives to identify the responsible parties. One of the more vocal opponents of the FBI’s North Korea theory has been Norse, a cyber-intelligence provider. Kurt Stammberger, the company’s senior vice president, recently laid out his case to the Huffington Post as to why he thinks that internal factors – specifically, an ex-employee of Sony – may have been central to the breach. As Stammberger detailed, the malware deployed in the hack contained Sony credentials, server addresses and digital certificates. He said, “It’s virtually impossible to get that information unless you are an insider, were an insider, or have been working with an insider.” While this evidence is compelling by itself, even if an insider is ultimately found not to have been involved in the attack, Norse’s assertion has already provided those in IT and cybersecurity with plenty to think about when it comes to the damage ex-employees can do on their way out the door. The Risks Inherent to Network Privilege On their first day at work, IT departments provide employees with all the tools they’ll need to do their jobs – the devices themselves, the necessary access credentials, remote access capabilities and more. The problem is, once...

Ex-Employees: All the Best, But Can We Have Our Personal Emails Back, Please?

It doesn’t matter if employees leave a company on unpleasant terms or quite amicably – it is absolutely essential that enterprises have solid, well-defined termination processes in place, and that they’re followed to the letter. In their final days at a company, employees can demand various personal documents, depending on local regulations. A final paycheck and unclaimed vacation days also need to be sorted out. A smooth termination process is a good business practice and documenting it in a written agreement, signed by both parties, helps to avoid misunderstandings. Putting this type of process in place is inexpensive, and in the long run costs nothing at all. A well-defined process also contributes tremendously to the overall integrity of the corporate network security structure, in that companies that follow these processes, drastically reduce the danger of sensitive information being leaked whenever an employee leaves the company. As part of the termination process, employees should confirm they have read and deleted all private emails on the companies’ servers, are no longer storing private data in the LAN, have transferred all personal data, e.g. phone numbers, videos, photos and text messages, from company-owned mobile devices, and that all other private information has either been deleted completely or transferred to a private data storage device. It’s also important that both sides acknowledge the hand over of all private data and that no more data is residing on the companies’ servers. In Germany, where employers are granted full ownership of email, failure to do so could create legal repercussions for companies. As a decision by the Higher Regional Court Dresden (4 W 961/12) explains,...