The race is on to solve potential remote working Olympic nightmare

The disruption that this year’s Olympic Games could cause to London’s transport infrastructure, and the resulting effect on businesses and organizations has been well-documented and should not be underestimated. We have already seen advice from the Games organizers suggesting that employees should be allowed to work at home during the event. As a result, both public and some private sector organizations have started to implement plans and hold practice runs for such an eventuality. However, with so many employees working from home for the first time there is a lot more for organisations to take into consideration than at first glance. As the pressure on public transport and road networks reaches its zenith, it is extremely likely that we will see a dramatic increase in the number of employees who will be working from home, in order to avoid the disruption, particularly in the build up to popular events. However, with such a sudden pressure on organizations’ IT networks the chances of a systems crash increases dramatically. Patrick Oliver Graf of NCP engineering* believes that businesses must be savvier about how they can prepare for this event. “With so many employees potentially working from home during the Olympic Games, the use of home PCs, private laptops and mobile devices like an Android tablet, is very likely to increase. The ‘Bring Your Own Device’ topic has received plenty of attention over the past few months, especially focusing on the security risk element. However, a sudden influx of employees using their own devices to access corporate networks could cause huge problems for organizations, already under strain as a result of a remote workforce,”...

Some VPNs still face compatibility, connection issues

As more and more companies are enabling remote access for their workforce, stability and compatibility are becoming as crucial as security in ensuring employee productivity. This trend is highlighted by recent news that both Certona and 3marketeers have rolled out NCP engineering’s Secure Client-Juniper Edition IPsec VPN to solve, not only security, but also stability and compatibility problems they faced with previous VPN deployments. NCP’s IPsec VPN client software has provided both companies with a more stable VPN connection and supported their migration to Windows 7 32-/64-bit PCs, while also seamlessly integrating with their existing VPN gateways from Juniper Networks. Despite only deploying the solution a short while ago, Dan Ruyle, Director of Information at Certona called NCP’s solution his “go-to answer for our enterprise’s secure remote access concerns.” Willy Lam, director, application development, 3marketeers added that “Juniper’s recommendation of the NCP Secure Client – Juniper Edition proved to be spot on.” The NCP Secure Client – Juniper Edition replaced Juniper’s own end-of-life Netscreen-Remote VPN. It includes data encryption, support of mobile connect cards, and one-time password token and certificate support through a public key infrastructure. It seems the new trifecta for ensuring successful VPN deployments – security, stability and...

What We’re Reading, Week of 3/12

Nextgov, Security Remains a Challenge for Telework IDSE, Health Officials Seeking More Secure Mobile Devices Dark Reading, Microsoft Flaw Demonstrates Dangers of Remote Desktop Access  CNET, SXSW: ‘Hot-spot honeypot’ hacker’s...

What We're Reading, Week of 3/12

Nextgov, Security Remains a Challenge for Telework IDSE, Health Officials Seeking More Secure Mobile Devices Dark Reading, Microsoft Flaw Demonstrates Dangers of Remote Desktop Access  CNET, SXSW: ‘Hot-spot honeypot’ hacker’s...

The Security of Remote Desktops

Lately, we’ve been getting a lot of questions about the security of remote desktop applications like LogMeIn, so here’s our take on this. More than 20 million people are registered on LogMeIn and are connecting from more than 125 million devices to their business networks. There’s no doubt that remote desktop tools, like LogMeIn, are essential for doing business in today’s mobile and distributed work environment. Yet in the rush for connectivity, too many organizations ignore the potential security risks for enabling remote desktop access – until they’re faced with a breach themselves. Here’s why we ultimately do not recommend remote desktop tools. They impose the following security risks on businesses: Because these tools run inside web browsers, they impose all of the security vulnerabilities of the browser on the connection, compromising the safety of any document retrieved from the corporate server.  Remote desktop tools facilitate access from any computer or terminal, opening an opportunity for unwanted visitors to get on to the network if the original user does not log out properly.  A particular concern with LogMeIn is, all communication is transacted via a third-party gateway system, exposing a company’s server to potentially malicious, unknown...