SSL Myths and Mobile Devices

Since posting our series on SSL myths, some people have asked how these SSL vulnerabilities apply to mobile phones. While mobile phones and other handheld devices are mistakenly considered relatively safe, this misnomer does not qualify as an SSL myth. It does, however, require addressing, as the consumerization of IT forces CIOs and network security architects to integrate these devices into the VPN structure.

Beyond the recent consumer-oriented, high profile hacks to celebrity address books, the danger to enterprises is being laid bare in a more subtle manner. In May 2011, Juniper Networks published a study that found risks to mobile phone security at an all time high, and cited a 400% rise in malware against the Android, for example. In 2008, critical mobile SSL VPN vulnerabilities were discovered by Christophe Vandeplas, as a laboratory example of the man-in- the-middle (MITM) exploit.

In mid-March 2011, after Comodo issued nine fraudulent certificates affecting several domains, Microsoft issued updates for its PC platforms to fix the vulnerabilities, but the company’s patch for Windows Phone 7 was  not immediately available. More details surrounding this attack were outlined in Myth 1. But clearly, the priority is not currently on the mobile platform, creating an undeniable threat.

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