What We’re Reading, Week of 10/26

InformationWeek… Keep Your Laptop Off Our Inadequate Network In this post, Jonathan Feldman asks why IT people resist end-users bringing their own equipment to the enterprise network. To be able to address issues like this, InformationWeek launched a research survey about end-user device practices in enterprise networks. We look forward to seeing the data and hearing what people had to say! Enterprise Networking Planet… Build an IPSEC VPN Without Losing Your Mind In this article, Charlie Schluting offers some tips on how to build an IPsec VPN. Most people expect to have a difficult time configuring IPsec, but Charlie explains the concepts and makes it a less intimidating process for readers. InformationWeek… Should Your Enterprise Network Be An Internet Hot Spot? Alexander Wolfe discusses whether enterprises should open up their networks, effectively turning them into Internet hot spots. With the emergence of both cloud computing and Windows 7, he says this could be a growing trend. Wolfe suggests Microsoft’s new operating system makes it unnecessary for users to launch VPN clients; instead, the discovery and authentication takes place automatically in the background anytime and anywhere a user connects to the Internet. Therefore, the average user will now perceive the Internet and his/her corporate network as pretty much one and the same thing. What do you think about the idea of the enterprise network as an Internet hot...

Rethink Remote Access Policy: Travis Fisher’s Advice

Continuing with our how to rethink remote access series, IT expert Travis Fisher has shared some thoughts on remote access policy with us. Travis is the Executive Vice President of Inacom Information Systems in Salisbury, MD, specializing in developing strong, secure reliable networks for Delmarva organizations. I’d like to discuss something that isn’t necessarily policy centric, but needs to be addressed during implementation. One thing that isn’t well discussed at this point is who owns the computer during the remote connection and how is it used. All too often, I see organizations that want remote access, but they do not understand the vulnerabilities that exist when you let an uncontrolled device VPN into your network. At this point, they are behind any access controls and security devices that you have in place. If it’s a shared PC in the family, you open yourself up to all the threats encountered when people consume all of the content on sites that are inappropriate for the workplace. If you are going to let remote users connect via VPN, you should have a Network Access Control (NAC) solution in place. This will make sure that the device conforms to your security policies. The general idea is to mitigate the risks associated with granting network access to different classes of users or even to devices that are not directly under the company’s control. It’s going to be up to the network administrator to deploy and configure a NAC solution based upon the needs and resources of their organization. Common policies that NAC enforces include the device having a current antivirus definition and scan, that...

Rethink Remote Access Policy: Javed Ikbal’s Advice

The next IT expert in our how to rethink remote access series is Javed Ikbal. Javed is the Chief Security Officer at zSquad, an Information Security consulting company in the Boston area. His specialty is building or re-engineering information security programs. Javed has taken some time to share his thoughts on remote access policy. – Define who may get remote access and the documentation/authorization for getting that privilege – Document and define the add/change/delete process – Define if the VPN can be installed on personally owned HW or not – Prohibit split tunneling – Enforce endpoint security (patches, AV, local firewall) – Activity they can do while connected to the...

What We're Reading, Week of 10/19

Around the blogosphere… With the release of Windows 7 today, there has been quite a bit of discussion about the new version and its features. We have captured some articles and posts that have shared some insight into what Windows 7 will bring. HowFunky.com Why Cisco Isn’t Doing What is Right for the Client In this post, Ed Horley suggests that Cisco is not doing what is right for their customers by only offering a 32-bit VPN client. Many people have upgraded to Windows 7 and 64-bit and he is frustrated that there is no Cisco supported 64-bit IPSec client for Windows Vista or 7. Gartner To 64-bit or Not 64-Bit? Steve Kleynhans discusses that with the launch of Windows 7, corporate customers need to start thinking about 64-bit. If it is not the right time to make the move, they should start preparing for the inevitable 64-bit shift. He suggests that at the very least everyone should include one 64-bit environment in their testing matrix. Steve has been using 64-bit and although he hit a showstopper with his corporate VPN, he resolved the issue and has been successfully running a beta VPN client for several months. If you haven’t already, do you think you will make the transition to 64-bit? Cnet News Windows 7 Debuts in New York In this Live Blog, Ina Fred is updating us with what is happening in New York as CEO Steve Ballmer introduces Microsoft’s newest operating system at a special event. Balmer and Brad Brooks, Windows’ VP of Marketing are showing the crowd Window’s 7 coolest features. The Windows Blog What People Are Saying About...

What We’re Reading, Week of 10/19

Around the blogosphere… With the release of Windows 7 today, there has been quite a bit of discussion about the new version and its features. We have captured some articles and posts that have shared some insight into what Windows 7 will bring. HowFunky.com Why Cisco Isn’t Doing What is Right for the Client In this post, Ed Horley suggests that Cisco is not doing what is right for their customers by only offering a 32-bit VPN client. Many people have upgraded to Windows 7 and 64-bit and he is frustrated that there is no Cisco supported 64-bit IPSec client for Windows Vista or 7. Gartner To 64-bit or Not 64-Bit? Steve Kleynhans discusses that with the launch of Windows 7, corporate customers need to start thinking about 64-bit. If it is not the right time to make the move, they should start preparing for the inevitable 64-bit shift. He suggests that at the very least everyone should include one 64-bit environment in their testing matrix. Steve has been using 64-bit and although he hit a showstopper with his corporate VPN, he resolved the issue and has been successfully running a beta VPN client for several months. If you haven’t already, do you think you will make the transition to 64-bit? Cnet News Windows 7 Debuts in New York In this Live Blog, Ina Fred is updating us with what is happening in New York as CEO Steve Ballmer introduces Microsoft’s newest operating system at a special event. Balmer and Brad Brooks, Windows’ VP of Marketing are showing the crowd Window’s 7 coolest features. The Windows Blog What People Are Saying About...